Replacing red meat with poultry can reduce breast cancer

According to study results published in the International Journal of Cancer.Replacing red meat with poultry may lower the risk for breast cancer.

Researchers reviewed data from participants in the Sister Study, which consisted of women with family histories of breast cancer. Women aged 35 to 74 years with no previous breast cancer diagnosis were enrolled in the study from between 2003 and 2009. Breast cancer diagnoses were reported by participants through August 14, 2015, the end of the follow-up period.

Researchers found that eating more red meat increased the risk for invasive breast cancer (HR highest vs. lowest quartile = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.48). In contrast, eating more poultry was linked to a decreased risk for invasive breast cancer (HR highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.72-1).

Results from a substitution model showed that the risk for invasive breast cancer decreased when the same amount of meat was consumed, but red meat was substituted with poultry (HR highest vs. lowest quartile of poultry consumption = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.58-0.89). Source

Air Pollution causing more diseases as much as one pack of cigarettes

According to a new study led by the University of Washington, Columbia University and the University at Buffalo, air pollution — especially ozone air pollution which is increasing with climate change — accelerates the progression of emphysema of the lung.

While previous studies have shown a clear connection of air pollutants with some heart and lung diseases, the new research published Aug. 13 in JAMA demonstrates an association between long-term exposure to all major air pollutants — especially ozone — with an increase in emphysema seen on lung scans. Emphysema is a condition in which destruction of lung tissue leads to wheezing, coughing and shortness of breath, and increases the risk of death.

The results are based on an extensive, 18-year study involving more than 7,000 people and a detailed examination of the air pollution they encountered between 2000 and 2018 in six metropolitan regions across the U.S.: Chicago, Winston-Salem, N.C., Baltimore, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Minnesota, and New York. The participants were drawn from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Air and Lung studies. Source

Fidgeting children burn more calories

Children who are frequently fidgeting during everyday activities burn more calories, using up energy amounting to nearly 3kg of body weight a year, according to a study.

The study, which was carried out in Australia but involved academics at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland, said fidgeting could have a "meaningful" biological or health effects in early childhood.

Forty children took it in turns to spend just over an hour in an observation room and had their calorie expenditure measured while they took part in a range of activities, including watching television, playing with toys on the floor, drawing and colouring in.

Researchers recorded their shifts in posture, which took forms, including sitting, standing and lying down. These shifts were found to have had a noticeable impact on the activity energy expenditure (AEE) of the children, who were mostly aged between four and five.

The researchers concluded that such fidgeting activity could have "meaningful" biological or health effects in early childhood.

People who work out in the morning seem to lose more weight

People who work out in the morning seem to lose more weight than people completing the same workouts later in the day, that’s according to a study that’s lasted almost ten years.

Several universities have been taking part in the Midwest Exercise Trial 2 for nearly a decade now. Participants could visit the gym whenever they wished between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.  They had to sign in so there was plenty of data.

When researchers checked weight change against exercise schedules, they noticed those people who usually worked out before noon consistently had lost more weight than those who exercised after 3 p.m. Source

Plastic particles falling from snow

Microscopic particles of plastic are falling out of the sky with snow, even in remote regions such as the Arctic and the Alps, according to a study. Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, and even in animals.

Over the past several years, microplastic particles have repeatedly been detected in sea-water, drinking water, and even in animals. Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in Germany have now found that microplastic particles can be transported over tremendous distances by the atmosphere and are later washed out of the air by precipitation, particularly snow.

Researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in Germany have now found that microplastic particles can apparently be transported over tremendous distances by the atmosphere and are later washed out of the air by precipitation, particularly snow.

The study conducted on snow samples from Helgo-land, Bavaria, Bremen, the Swiss Alps and the Arctic confirms that the snow at all sites contained high concentrations of microplastic -- even in remote reaches of the Arctic, on the island Svalbard, and in the snow of drifting ice floes. Source


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